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Determining the Focus Values of De La Salle University – Dasmariñas Faculty Development Cooperative (DLSU-D FDC): Towards the Development of its Values Formation Program
Jose R. Domingo, Jr., EdD

Abstract

            This study focused primarily on identifying focus values towards the development of cooperative values formation program for the De La Salle University- Dasmariñas Faculty Development Cooperative (DLSU-D FDC). It employed qualitative-participatory research using survey questionnaire and Focus Group discussion for data gathering. It is a participatory kind of research because the researcher and the respondents are part of the entire process.

            The primary source of data was the information given by the respondents through a survey questionnaire that was formulated by the researcher. The respondents were selected randomly from leaders and members of De La Salle University- Dasmariñas Faculty Development Cooperative (DLSU-D FDC).  The Focus Group members were also respondents and were the ones who processed the data together with the researcher using the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis.

            The findings reveal the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of De La Salle University- Dasmariñas Faculty Development Cooperative (DLSU-D FDC. It has found out the needs of the DLSU-D FDC, namely:

  1. Maintaining transparency and strengthening information dissemination;
  2. Harnessing the active participation and commitment of the members;
  3. Maximizing the use of technology, increasing the number of staff, other cooperative investments;
  4. Intensifying the social commitment of the cooperative;
  5. Adopting the ten International Cooperative Alliance (ICA) values of self-help, self-responsibility, democracy, equality, equity, solidarity, honesty, openness, social responsibility, and caring for others.

            It also specified the Focus Values which can be categorized into: (1) Personal Development; (2) Community - Oriented; and (3) Cooperative Sense of Ownership.

            In the light of the findings, it is conclusive to say that the values formation program will nourish DLSU-D FDC to pursue its dreams, aspirations, and stability and growth. The focus values would define what values we want to live; values we want to express, values governing our administrative styles, and values directing our cooperative system.

            Also, the values formation program is a response to today’s economic, social and cultural problems of greater magnitude. It will lead to a program that promotes group entrepreneurship among members and non-members in order to strengthen their capabilities.

Introduction

            Cooperatives will greatly contribute to our government efforts for economic, social, political and spiritual recovery of our country. The effective role that cooperatives will play in the over - all efforts towards national development and rehabilitation will depend upon the proper understanding of cooperatives, their true nature and concepts together with basic principles and values which guide cooperatives to pursue their dreams, aspirations and operation.

            A Cooperative, as defined by the International Cooperative Alliance (ICA), is “an autonomous association of persons, united voluntarily to meet their common, economic, social, and cultural needs and aspirations through jointly owned and democratically controlled enterprise.” On the other hand, Article 3 of Republic Act 6938 otherwise known as the Cooperative Code of the Philippines, defines a cooperative as “a duly registered association of persons, with a common bond of interest, who have voluntarily joined to achieve a lawful common social or economic end, making equitable contribution to the capital; required and accepting a fair share of the risks and benefits of the undertaking in accordance with the universally accepted cooperative principles.”

            As defined therefore, domestically and globally, a cooperative can contribute to the economic, social, political, and spiritual growth of the people. Economically, cooperative can supply viable alternatives for economic prosperity of its members. Socially, a cooperative has an extremely important role to play. It provides a venue to bond people together and work for the promotion of a just and humane society. Politically, a cooperative must be active to any political involvement. By political involvement, we mean that members collectively raise their voice in a quest for peace and justice. Cooperatives must be leaders in this advocacy. Finally, a cooperative promotes spiritual growth to its members. Spiritual growth is achieved by a concrete manifestation of Christ’s love among its members. Cooperative members must be living witnesses to work in fostering mutual respect and love among themselves so that love, justice, and solidarity would prosper.

            One of the necessary factors which affect the success of any cooperatives, is the education of its leaders and members. The foundation of cooperative education lies primarily in the formation of its values. Our values tell us where we need to go. They are truths upon which we draw out our objective moral standards and when done repeatedly, become a pattern of life of the cooperative. In the formation program, it is important to sustain both the initial and on-going formation phases because without a good formation program, it is difficult to attain the vision of a cooperative and maintain its vitality. To make the formation program a success, it must address the total life needs of the members of the cooperative. The program must also be contextualized within the cooperative.

            The De La Salle University – Dasmariñas Faculty Development Cooperative (DLSU-D FDC) is a multi-purpose cooperative registered by Cooperative Development Authority (CDA). In 2003, Mr. Jose R. Domingo, Jr., then president of the De La Salle University – Dasmariñas Faculty Association, Inc. saw the need for an organization that would help university faculty meet their financial needs. Initially, he proposed to set up a faculty canteen to generate additional income for faculty members and to pool their savings together to help one another through loans in times of need. As a new cooperative, the DLSU-D FDC leaders and members need to work mutually to reach the unprecedented heights of its success. This can be done through a cooperative values formation program in order to avoid any failure in fulfilling its vision. As mentioned in Garcia & Guanzon (2004), the first factor that contributes to the downfall of any cooperatives is the lack of training and education of leaders and members especially in the field of cooperative values and principles. Hence, in order to actualize the vision of DLSU-D FDC to be “a model and a leader, and a cooperative empowered to uplift the economic, social, and spiritual condition of members by providing excellent service to its members, the researcher thought of  identifying the focus values towards the development of cooperative values formation program for DLSU-D FDC.

Conceptual Framework

            This study intends to design a cooperative values formation program for the DLSU-D FDC. The program serves as a concrete response to the vision of DLSU-D FDC to be “a model and a leader cooperative empowered to uplift the economic, social, and spiritual condition of members by providing excellent service.”

            According to Haiman & Hilgert (1972), the first part of any formal program is the assessment of needs. Assessment of needs requires an analysis of organizational needs and individual needs.
Applying the aforecited principle, the concept of designing cooperative values formation program for DLSU-D FDC using the SWOT analysis has two parts: Part 1: Assessment of needs both the community and individual needs. Part 2: Determining the Focus Values towards formation program.

Part 1 Assessment of Needs

Phase I: The Environmental Scan.  A scan of the internal and external environment is an important part of determining the needs of a cooperative. Environmental factors internal to the community usually can be classified as strengths or weaknesses, and those external to the community can be classified as opportunities or threats.

Phase II: The Cooperative Needs Assessment. There are two factors which determine the present needs of the cooperative, namely:

A. SWOT Analysis

It is accomplished by assessing community strengths (what a community can do) and weaknesses (what a community cannot do) in addition to opportunities (potential favorable conditions for a community) and threats (potential unfavorable conditions for a community). Once this is completed, SWOT analysis determines if the information indicates something that will assist the community in accomplishing its objectives (a strength or opportunity), or if it indicates an obstacle that must be overcome or minimized to achieve desired results (weakness or threat). In applying the SWOT analysis, it is necessary to minimize or avoid both weaknesses and threats. Weaknesses should be looked at in order to convert them into strengths.

B. International Cooperative Alliance (ICA) Values

The ICA values are given values. In order to determine whether or not these values are the present needs of DLSU-D FDC, the researcher prepared a questionnaire, which was classified into three parts, to wit: The value stated is clearly defined. The value can be of help to our cooperative. The value is currently practiced in our cooperative.

Part 2: Determining the Focus Values Towards Values Formation Program
            The Focus Values are identified by the respondents. Carrying out an analysis using the SWOT framework will help the cooperative to focus on the desired activities in the values where it is strong and where the greatest opportunities lie
.
            The cooperative values formation program includes context, content, and general objective.
These concepts are shown schematically in the Figure below.


Methodology


Research Design

            This study employed qualitative-participatory research using Focus Group discussion for data gathering. It is a participatory kind of research because the researcher and the respondents are parts of the entire process.

            Creswell (1998) defines qualitative research as an inquiry process of understanding based on distinct methodological tradition of inquiry that researches a social or human problem. In this study, data were gathered from the selected leaders and members of DLSU-D FDC using the SWOT analysis in assessing the needs.

            SWOT is an abbreviation for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. According to Ferrell et al. (1998), SWOT analysis is a basic, straightforward model that provides direction and serves as a basis for the development of plans. The role of SWOT analysis is to take the information from the environmental analysis and separate it into internal issues (strengths and weaknesses) and external issues (opportunities and threats). Once this is completed, SWOT analysis determines if the information indicates something that will assist the organization in accomplishing its objectives (a strength or opportunity), or if it indicates an obstacle that must be overcome or minimized to achieve desired results (weakness or threat). It is not simply enough to identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of a company. In applying SWOT analysis, it is necessary to minimize or avoid both weaknesses and threats. Weaknesses should be looked at in order to convert them into strengths.

Data Gathering Procedure

            The primary source of data was the information given by the respondents through a survey questionnaire that was formulated by the researcher.
            The process in developing this research included three phases as shown below.

 

 

Phase I

 

 

Environmental Scan

Strengths
Weaknesses
Opportunities and
Threats

 

Phase II

 

Needs Assessment Analysis

SWOT Analysis
International Cooperative Alliance (ICA) values

 

Phase III

 

Identification of Focus Values


            The respondents were selected randomly from leaders and members of DLSU-D FDC.  The Focus Group members were also respondents and were the ones who processed the data together with the researcher. There were 18 selected leaders and members of DLSU-D FDC who met  on December 8, 2005 to discuss the results of the survey conducted to 85 leaders and members of  DLSU-D FDC by the researcher.

Instrumentation

            The researcher adopted the guide questionnaires formulated by James Manktelow on Understanding Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities, and Threats (see annex A) with the ten values identified by the International Cooperative Alliance (ICA). The survey was conducted to selected respondents of DLSU-D FDC to assess the needs related to the cooperative values formation program for DLSU-D FDC.
            The final format of the survey questionnaire was divided into five parts, namely:
Part I – the strengths of the community
Part II – the weaknesses of the community
Part III – the opportunities of the community
Part IV – the threats of the community
Part V – the ten International Cooperative Alliance (ICA) values

            Dr. Perla Rizalina M. Tayko who is an expert in human development, instruction curriculum, and organizational development processes validated the final format. She was the Dean of Graduate Studies of Southeast Asia Interdisciplinary Development Institute (SAIDI) and currently the Program Director of Masters of Management in organizational development, Graduate School of Business, Assumption University in Bangkok, Thailand.

Related Literature

A.
Origin

            The word cooperative is rooted from a French word “cooperari”. The word co is an English word which means to be with. And the word operari  is a Latin word, which means to operate. Thus, working together to attain a common vision is the underlying principle of cooperativism. As mentioned in Union of Metro Manila Cooperatives (2003), the birth of cooperativism is a form of social response against extreme and widespread deprivation, hunger and oppression in the 18th and 19th centuries. It is an alternative to the decadent, profit-driven, acquisitive, and individualistic system that has favored the concentration of control of capital, farms, industries, and political power in the hands of the rich minority.

            Robert Owen & the Owenites thought of and experimented on the ideal cooperative society by building new settlements where there shall be no room for the “immoralities” of the capitalist system that he despised so much, and where his ideals of a self-reliant community of equals shall be the way of life. Cooperative was founded in the midst of widespread poverty and social uproar in Rochedale Town by 28 Owenites, social activists, chartists, religious reformers, teetotalers, and trade unionists, whose common desire was to see the triumph of equity, equality, human rights, and democracy. They blazed a trail through self-help, self-responsibility and interdependence, setting the course of cooperative’s modern history.

            Many other 19th century cooperatives in the United Kingdom worked hand in hand with the labor, women, religious reform, and temperance movements. At the same period and thereafter, the credit unions and rural cooperatives flourished in Germany, Denmark, Canada, United States, and Japan with the support of their respective farmers’ movements.

            The 21st century social movements of the middle class that called for more flexible and spontaneous forms of cooperation with the development of socio-economic, non-profit, and mixed organizations, have spurred the formation of new forms of cooperatives.   Yair Levi termed this as hybrid or multi-stakeholder cooperatives (as the “social cooperatives” developed in Italy) that make possible the involvement not just of the traditionally referred to as member-users but a more varied composition of altruistic member-believers and stakeholders through their “multi-stakeholder” organizational framework.

B. The Seven Principles of Cooperativism

            The 1966 review of International Cooperative Alliance (founded in 1895, half a century after the Rochedale period, and it took upon itself the responsibilities for the refinement of the cooperative principles and for the consolidation and further expansion of the cooperative movement itself) declared six essential principles of cooperativism: voluntary membership; democracy; limited interest on share capital; distribution of surplus; provision for education; and cooperation among cooperatives.

            However, in the 1995 review it produced a comprehensive statement on the cooperative Identity. The statement includes a definition of cooperative, a listing of the movement’s key values, and a revised set of principles intended to guide cooperative organizations at the beginning of the twenty-first century. The reformulated principles are voluntary and open membership; democratic member control; member economic participation; autonomy and independence; education, training and information; cooperation among cooperatives; and concern for community.

            The conclusion of the ICA Background Paper on the seven principles of cooperative identity stresses the importance of these principles as no less than the lifeblood of the cooperative movement.  It also describes the principles as “elastic,” meaning flexible, and therefore “applicable with different degrees of detail to different kinds of cooperatives in different kinds of situations.”


Hereunder is that conclusion:

The cooperative principles cumulatively are the lifeblood of the movement. Derived from the values that have infused the movement from its beginnings, they shape the structures and determine the attitudes that provide the movement’s distinctive perspectives.  They are the guidelines through which cooperators strive to develop their cooperative organizations. They are inherently practical principles, fashioned as much by generations of experience as by philosophical thought.  They are, consequently, elastic, applicable with different degrees of detail to different kinds of cooperative in different kinds of situations.  Above all, they require cooperators to make decisions: for example, as to the nature of the democracy of their institutions, the roles of different stakeholders and the allocation of surpluses that are created. They are the essential qualities that make cooperative movement valuable.

Principle One: VOLUNTARY AND OPEN MEMBERSHIP
Cooperatives are voluntary organizations, open to all persons able to use their services and willing to accept the responsibilities of membership, without gender, social, racial, political, or religious discrimination.

Principle Two: DEMOCRATIC MEMBER CONTROL
Cooperatives are democratic organizations controlled by their members, who actively participate in setting their policies and making decisions. Men and women serving as elected representatives are accountable to the membership. In primary cooperatives members have equal voting rights (one member, one vote) and cooperatives at higher levels are also organized in a democratic manner.

Principle Three: MEMBER ECONOMIC PARTICIPATION
Members contribute to, and democratically control, the capital of their cooperative. At least part of that capital is usually the common property of the cooperative. Members usually receive limited compensation, if any, on capital subscribed as a condition of membership. Members allocate surpluses for any or all of the following purposes; developing their cooperative, possibly by putting up reserves, part of which at least would be indivisible; benefiting members in proportion to their transactions with the cooperative; and supporting other activities approved by the membership.

Principle Four: AUTONOMY and INDEPENDENCE
Cooperatives are autonomous, self-help organizations controlled by their members. If they enter into agreements with other organizations, including governments, or raise capital from external sources, they do so on terms that ensure democratic control by their members and maintain their cooperative autonomy.

Principle Five: EDUCATION, TRAINING AND INFORMATION
Cooperatives provide education and training for their members, elected representative, managers and employees so they can contribute effectively to the development of their cooperatives. They inform the general public – particularly the youth and opinion leaders – about the nature and benefits of cooperation.

Principle Six: COOPERATION AMONG COOPERATIVES
Cooperatives serve their members most effectively and strengthen the cooperative movement by working together through local, national, regional, and international structures.
Just as the stability and power of a cooperative is created by “member-cooperation”, the bond and power of the cooperative movement is created by cooperation among cooperatives. This bond and power can escalate into growth and sustained dynamism.

            Cooperation among cooperatives, moreover, strengthens the individual cooperative in its service to members. In addition, because cooperatives identify with community, the scale of impact can be as great as the waves of growth and dynamism that cooperation among cooperatives will create.

Principle Seven: CONCERN FOR COMMUNITY
Cooperatives work for the sustainable development of their communities through policies approved by their members.

            Other principles have come and gone. But the very useful principle of synergism, has remained in the “silent” realm. It is the silent soul of cooperativism, from which all the categorically articulated principles logically flow.

C. The Essence of Values
            Values as defined by Bauson (1994) are “truths upon which we base our objective moral standard. It serves as a guide, a norm, a principle by which a person lives.”  They are, therefore, ideals that give significance to our lives, that are reflected through the priorities that we choose, and that we act on consistently and repeatedly.

            As cited by Hale (1994) there are seven criteria for how an individual forms and chooses a value:

  1. Choosing freely. If a value is to guide one’s life whether or not authority is watching, it must be a result of free choice.
  2. Choosing from among alternatives. Obviously, there are can be no choice if there are no alternatives from which to choose. It makes nonsense, for example, to say that one values eating. One really has no choice in the matter.
  3. Choosing after, thoughtful consideration of the consequences of each alternative. For something to guide one’s life intelligently and meaningfully, it must emerge from weighing and understanding the alternatives.
  4. Prizing and cherishing. When we value something, we prize it, cherish it, esteem it, respect it, hold it dear. We are happy with our values.
  5. Affirming. We are willing to publicly affirm our values. We may even be willing to champion them.
  6. Acting upon choices. Values show up in aspects of our living. Nothing can be a value that does not give direction to actual living.
  7. Repeating. When someone holds a value, it is very likely to reappear on a number of occasions in that person’s life. It shows up in several different situations, at several different times.

            In order to result a value, the abovementioned criteria must all be present. These criteria depart from the traditional works of virtues, because one sees virtues personally and subjectively.

Results and Discussion
            The present needs of DLSU-D FDC in values formation are affected by the results of environmental scan (experiential) and the given International Cooperative Alliance (ICA) values.
            The process of naming the Focus Values followed two stages as shown below:

 

Stage 1: The needs of the Cooperative
From problem 2, the identified needs of the Cooperative are as follows:

  1. To maintain transparency and strengthen information dissemination;
  2. To harness the active participation and commitment of the members;
  3. To maximize the use of technology, increase the number of staff, and other cooperative investments;
  4. To intensify the social commitment of the cooperative;
  5. To include in the values formation program the ten ICA given values of self-help, self-responsibility, democracy, equality, equity, solidarity, honesty, openness, social responsibility, and caring for others.

Stage 2: The vision of the DLSU-D FDC

            A model and a leader cooperative empowered to uplift the economic, social, and spiritual condition of members by providing excellent service to its members.

            Based on the result of the discussions, the Focus Values can be divided into three categories: (1) Personal Development; (2) Community Oriented; and (3) Cooperative Sense of Ownership.

            The ten ICA values of self-help, self-responsibility, democracy, equality, equity, solidarity, honesty, openness, social responsibility, caring for others  proclaimed by the International Cooperative Alliance( ICA) in 1995, possess the only contemporary social-political-economic philosophy which explicitly and practically promotes and actualizes community health and strength. As cited in Pobihushchy (2002), the International Cooperative Alliance( ICA) defines the ten values as follows:

I. Personal Development

            Cooperatives are not merely economic instruments concerned with dividends and related economic and financial returns. They are above all instruments of change for total human development. This means the development of the human beings in all aspects of life – economic, social, political, cultural, and spiritual. The goal of cooperative is to make men with sense of both individual and joint responsibility so that they may have full personal life and full social life.

1. Self-help

            This value has a dual referent. On the one hand, it refers to the individual person “self” and on the other, it refers to the collective “self” such as a cooperative, for instance. Self-help as a value encourages the individual person to satisfy her/his own needs and obligations through personal effort to the extent reasonably possible under the circumstances. An important need and obligation is the contribution to the realization of a healthy sustainable community. This is a very important element in achieving personal human fulfillment. As a corollary, this same reasoning applies to the collective “self” such as, for instance, a cooperative. This value encourages the cooperative to satisfy its own collective needs and obligations through its own efforts to the extent reasonably possible under the circumstances. It is from this value that the idea flows that each individual member shares the responsibility for the success of the cooperative.

2. Self-responsibility

            This value, similar to the self-help, has a dual referent. The individual person is obligated and encouraged by this value to be responsible for her/his own well-being and to take responsibility for any consequences that flow from whatever he/she does in pursuit of personal need satisfaction. The corollary to this is that the collective “self” is responsible for its own well-being and for the consequences that flow from that pursuit.

3. Equality

            Equality as a value flows from the traditional wisdom that each person, irrespective of talent, skill or appearance, possesses an intrinsic value and thus as a human is of no greater or lesser value than anyone else. Each person is intrinsically valuable, without the attachment of inferiority or superiority. While certain skills and talents may be of greater importance to the well-being of a collective, be it a society, community or co-operative, each person as a human being within that cooperative is of equal value. This value is particularly pertinent to decision-making and governance of the collective requiring that each person in that collective has a reasonable opportunity to participate in that decision-making and governance. This value is particularly and peculiarly relevant to DEMOCRACY and DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE.

4. Solidarity

            Solidarity as a value refers to the respect and dignity with which the individual persons of a community relate to one another. It is a relationship that grows out of each person seeing the other as valuable as the self. Solidarity also encompasses the concept of interdependency, which is so critical to the health, and vitality of the cooperative. Community is an important product of solidarity, or as a corollary, solidarity is an essential characteristic of the successful cooperative.

5. Honesty

            This value has the quality of both end and means. Honesty is a good in itself and is a means to other goods. Honesty is an important prerequisite to continuing good relations among persons and within collectives such as cooperatives. Honesty is both a quality of, and a means to, human fulfillment. Truth is a critically important component of rewarding community and collective life. Honesty is the sine qua non for the individual and the collective of individuals experiencing and benefiting from the truth.

II. Community Oriented

            Cooperatives works for the welfare of their members but at the same time integrate themselves into the life of the community, in particular and that of the nation in general. Cooperatives therefore, enhance the people’s welfare by helping increase the productivity of their members and that of the communities in which they are located. By the very nature of their activities, cooperatives strengthen not only the economic but also the social base of the communities in which they operate.

1. Social Responsibility

            This value is most relevant to the public image, which the cooperative enjoys/suffers in the community that it serves and beyond. On the one hand, it refers to the cooperative accepting responsibility for and ameliorating the negative consequences for society stemming from its actions and operations. On the other hand, social responsibility refers to the cooperative’s acceptance of the responsibility to work towards the betterment of society and towards the amelioration of oppressive conditions in that society. The need to intensify the social commitment of the cooperative is absorbed by this value.

2. Caring for Others

            “Caring for others” was and continues to be the prime mover in the establishment of successful cooperatives the world over. This value refers to the obligation that each individual cooperator, each cooperative and the cooperative movement as a whole must act in such a way as not to cause harm or difficulty for others either of today, tomorrow or of the distant future. Additionally, this value imposes the obligation and requirement on every element of the cooperative movement to be pro-active in leadership towards rectifying the structural and social causes of oppression and indignity. This value flows out of the ancient, but nonetheless relevant, dictum: “Do unto others what you would have them do unto you”.

III. Sense of Ownership

            Cooperatives are member-owned member controlled and member-used. Ownership is a very important factor in the success of any cooperative. It is necessary in order that the members may have full authority to manage and control their cooperative. If a cooperative is started and operated solely from borrowed capital, it violates the principle of self-help and loses much of its autonomous character. Cooperatives must depend on the patronage of their own members and from non-members although in certain cases a limited patronage by non-members may be allowed mainly for reasons of business viability and service to community.

1. Democracy

            Democracy is a philosophy of governance in which the people are collectively the repository of authority. The exercise of that authority is democratically legitimate only if the people who will be affected by that exercise are consulted openly and freely. Popular elections in and of themselves do not a democracy make. Free and open discussion, deliberation and consultation are essential preconditions to elections as democratic elements. Of course, that means that the members have reasonable access to all the information relevant to the decisions respecting the exercise of the authority of which they are the repository.

2. Equity

            This value has two distinct but related meanings. One meaning of this value is as an end. The other meaning is that of a means to that end. Equity as an end refers to fairness in the relationships between and among individuals and the manner with which authority is exercised over persons. Equity as a MEANS refers to the ownership of assets with which persons can protect themselves against exploitation by others, mainly corporate interests. In the cooperative, that ownership gives the member the right to participate in the decisions of the cooperative which, along with the participation of all the other members of the cooperative, assures each and all of them fairness in their relations with each other and the collective, i.e., the co-operative. It is the equity that provides the owners with the right and opportunity to structure the decision-making and governance process that will assure that fairness is an essential characteristic of the cooperative.

3. Openness

            This value refers to the structured and reasonable availability to the membership of information and knowledge relevant to the successful life of the organization. This value presupposes that the governance of the organization is a democracy; hence, the membership collective is the repository of the authority exercised in that governance. The need to maintain transparency and strengthen information dissemination is under this particular value.

4. Service

            The vision of DLSU-D FDC is to be a model and a leader cooperative empowered to uplift the economic, social, and spiritual condition of members by providing excellent service to its members. Cooperatives are organized to serve their members by providing them the goods and services they need at cost. Members contribute to the capital of the cooperative in the sense that they do not invest their money in a capitalist enterprise in which the primary objective is to get the maximum profit from their investment. Members join cooperatives because they need their services. Cooperatives, however, in serving the members, do not act as charitable organizations. The members are aware that the benefits they derive from their association come from their contributions and are the result of their mutual desire to help on another. Cooperatives are not for profit, not for charity but for service. The need to maximize the use of technology, increase the number of staff, and venture into other cooperative investments is achieved by promoting the value of service.

Conclusions
            In the light of the preceding findings, the following conclusions are drawn:

  1. The values formation program will nourish DLSU-D FDC, help it pursue its dreams and aspirations, and affect stability and growth. The focus values define what values the members want to live; values they want to express, values governing their administrative styles, and values directing their cooperative system.
  2. The Focus Areas, namely (1) Personal Development; (2) Community Oriented; and (3) Cooperative Sense of Ownership are interconnected and interdependent. While each one of these values is of critical importance to the DLSU-D FDC, not one of them stands alone in defining the importance and integrity of the cooperative.
  3. The values formation program will promote active participation of the members in the management and operation of DLSU-D FDC. It will inspire both leaders and members to best express themselves by actively sharing mutual responsibilities and potentials to collectively attain their vision.
  4. The values formation program is a response to today’s economic, social and cultural problems of greater magnitude. It will lead to a program that promotes group entrepreneurship among members and non-members in order to strengthen their capabilities.

Recommendations

            The following recommendations are drawn as a result of this study:

  1. The De La Salle University – Dasmariñas Faculty Development Cooperative (DLSU-D FDC) should be committed to the values of self-help, self-responsibility, democracy, equality, equity, and unity and to the ethical values of honesty, openness, social responsibility, and caring for others.
  2. There is a need to develop a module for each topic prior to the implementation of DLSU-D FDC Cooperative Values Formation Program. Each module has its own a). learning objectives, b). activity, c). deepening of the topic, and d). action plan. The modules will be used by the education committee that is primarily in charge of both initial and on-going formation of DLSU-D FDC leaders and members.
  3. Any program cannot continue without a sufficient fund to support its implementation. Hence, an expedient scheme to finance the program should be drafted. Schemes such as, pledges, donations, budget allotment and other fund-raising activities should be approved by the General Assembly.

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